Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Drug Therapy

Therapeutic targets Reduction of pain Increase in the ability to move Therapy recommendations Anti-inflammatory drugs (drugs that inhibit inflammatory processes; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs), e.g. acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ibuprofen. If necessary, injection of local anesthetics (local anesthesia) and / or steroids (glucocorticoids) under the acromion (subacromial infiltration). See also under “Further therapy“. Further notes The … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Drug Therapy

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Diagnostic Tests

Obligatory medical device diagnostics. Radiograph of the affected tendon or region, in two planes – to localize the calcific deposit and to assess its extent. Sonography (ultrasound examination) of the affected tendon or affected region – to localize the calcific deposit and to assess the extent. Optional medical device diagnostics – depending on the results … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Diagnostic Tests

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Surgical Therapy

If spontaneous healing (self-healing) fails to occur or if conservative therapies do not produce the desired results, pain persists or is chronic (> 6 months), and in cases of larger calcified foci (diameter > 1 cm), surgical therapy should be considered. Removal of the calcium foci relieves pressure, which also relieves severe pain. The removal … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Surgical Therapy

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Prevention

To prevent tendinitis calcarea (tendon calcification), attention must be paid to reducing individual risk factors. Behavioral risk factors High-risk sports such as throwing sports (for tendinitis calcarea in the shoulder area (calcified shoulder)). Disease-related risk factors. Injuries, poisonings and other consequences of external causes (S00-T98). Trauma (injury) to the shoulder, unspecified.

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Symptoms, Complaints, Signs

The following symptoms and complaints may indicate tendinitis calcarea (tendonosis): Restricted movement Rubor (redness) Pain Tumor (swelling) The following symptoms and complaints may indicate tendinitis calcarea in the shoulder (calcific shoulder): Pseudoparalysis (inability to move the arm) – especially in the resorption phase, see “Etiology/causes” below. Painful arc (“painful arc”) – In this case, pain … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Symptoms, Complaints, Signs

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Causes

Pathogenesis (disease development) Tendinosis calcarea is thought to result from degenerative processes, such as those triggered by reduced blood flow to the tendon attachment to bone. Mechanical causes such as an anatomically narrow space may also promote degeneration. It is likely that the development of calcifications is multifactorial. The calcification foci can cause discomfort due … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Causes

Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Therapy

General measures Depending on the symptoms and stage of disease: Relief and immobilization Sports leave As soon as the pain subsides, physiotherapy (see below) should be started. In case of trauma – care depending on the nature of the injury. Conventional non-surgical therapy methods Anti-inflammatory drugs (drugs that inhibit inflammatory processes). In case of tendinosis … Tendon Calcification (Tendinosis Calcarea): Therapy

Splayfoot (Pes Transversoplanus)

Drop-splayfoot (pes planotransversus; ICD-10 M21.67: Other acquired deformities of the ankle and foot) is one of the acquired foot deformities. Shape deformities of the feet can also be congenital (ICD-10 Q66.8: Other congenital deformities of the feet). Mainly, flat splayfoot does not occur congenitally. Along with splayfoot, it is one of the most common acquired … Splayfoot (Pes Transversoplanus)

Splayfoot (Pes Transversoplanus): Medical History

The anamnesis (medical history) represents an important component in the diagnosis of fallen splayfoot. Family history Are there any conditions in your family that are common? Are there any hereditary diseases in your family? Social history What is your profession? Do you often wear shoes with high heels? Current medical history/systemic history (somatic and psychological … Splayfoot (Pes Transversoplanus): Medical History

Schönlein-Henoch Purpura: Classification

Schönlein-Henoch purpura is classified as follows: Palpable (palpable) purpura (small-spotted capillary hemorrhage in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or mucous membranes) or petechiae (pinpoint hemorrhage of the skin or mucous membranes; considered an obligatory criterion), predominantly of the legs plus one of the following criteria (sensitivity (percentage of diseased patients in whom the disease is detected … Schönlein-Henoch Purpura: Classification

Schönlein-Henoch Purpura: Examination

A comprehensive clinical examination is the basis for selecting further diagnostic steps: General physical examination – including blood pressure, pulse, body temperature, body weight, body height; furthermore: Inspection (viewing). Of the skin, mucous membranes [purpura (spontaneous, small-spotted hemorrhages of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or mucous membranes); petechial hemorrhages (pinpoint hemorrhages of the skin), especially on … Schönlein-Henoch Purpura: Examination